Connectivity Sound Bites
Sometimes, perhaps most of the time, all you have is a chance to say one or two sentences. Here are a few for your framing pleasure.21-Jun-2006

Sound bites are an important tool for capturing ideas. I plan to update this list with sound bites useful for understanding connectivity issues as we move

  • The Regulatorium treats the Internet as just another service. This is a multi-trillion dollar lie! Connectivity is fundamental and once we recognize that we give everyone an opportunity to contribute by creating services and adding value.
  • Marketplaces that provide opportunity rather than just solutions allow demand to create supply. This is the essence of Moore’s law but since Gordon says it’s not about economics I’ll claim this as Frankston’s Law.
  • It is about our ability to use our own networks rather than being tenants communicating at the sufferance of a carrier.
  • Ben Franklin didn’t start out as a revolutionary but he learned there was no middle ground.
  • We need a bridge loan to transition from the service model to an infrastructure model. The sooner we act the sooner we will benefit from the value of our infrastructure.
  • It’s not how you play the game if you lose by playing it at all.
  • It doesn’t make sense to fund transport by selling services. That’s like paying to sit in a nightclub by buying drinks you don’t want.
  • It’s all about creating billable events. It’s the reason for the complex infrastructure and thus it’s all about billing for billings sake while creating no real value.
  • Numbers don’t lie, they just lay there. If the premise is false they are all meaningless and the premise is indeed false.
  • The greenest grass is well fertilized Astroturf. Astroturf is a term for fake grassroots efforts funded by interested parties.
  • HDTV is 1995 technology, it’s as if Congress wanted to force us to buy quadraphonic speakers – the marketplace be damned.
  • OTA (Over the Air) Television is only the trailing 15% of the marketplace. Why the fuss?
  • The broadcast bit makes improving your TV a federal offense.
  • The Regulatorium is complex and self reinforcing like a ball of wax. It will bounce but it won’t stick to any real surface.
  • To win at Roulette you spin the wheel and then find value in whatever number you get. Only a fool will put himself into a position where there is only one way to win rather than finding value in whatever you get.
  • The goal must be to assure that we can create our own solutions. It’s not about the carriers mistreating us equally while assuring their profitability.
  • Neutral is not enough – it is about our ability to use our networks rather than being tenants communicating at the sufferance of the carriers.
  • Rather than seek neutrality as a concession we must address the structural problems inherent in the concept of “telecommunications”.
  • We’ve come a long way since 1980 when we didn’t even own the wires in our own homes. It’s 2006 why don’t we own the wires in our community?
  • We don’t know who will create the new services so we must make sure that everyone can so someone will.
  • If we can tolerate failure we can get the benefits success. That’s why the Internet has been so successful. It’s also an essential part of capitalism. Corporations are a unit of risk taking but we only get the benefits if corporations can die when they become dysfunctional.
  • Net Neutrality is the modern “separate but equal”. Connectivity is fundamental not just another service.
  • The Regulatorium treats the Internet as just another service. This is a multi-trillion dollar lie! Connectivity is fundamental and once we recognize that we give everyone an opportunity to contribute by creating services and adding value.
  • Marketplaces that provide opportunity rather than just solutions allow demand to create supply. This is the essence of Moore’s law but since Gordon says it’s not about economics I’ll claim this as Frankston’s Law.
  • It is about our ability to use our own networks rather than being tenants communicating at the sufferance of a carrier.
  • Ben Franklin didn’t start out as a revolutionary but he learned there was no middle ground.
  • We need a bridge loan to transition from the service model to an infrastructure model. The sooner we act the sooner we will benefit from the value of our infrastructure.
  • It’s not how you play the game if you lose by playing it at all.
  • It doesn’t make sense to fund transport by selling services. That’s like paying to sit in a nightclub by buying drinks you don’t want.
  • It’s all about creating billable events. It’s the reason for the complex infrastructure and thus it’s all about billing for billings sake while creating no real value.
  • Numbers don’t lie, they just lay there. If the premise is false they are all meaningless and the premise is indeed false.
  • The greenest grass is well fertilized Astroturf. Astroturf is a term for fake grassroots efforts funded by interested parties.
  • HDTV is 1995 technology, it’s as if Congress wanted to force us to buy quadraphonic speakers – the marketplace be damned.
  • OTA (Over the Air) Television is only the trailing 15% of the marketplace. Why the fuss?
  • The broadcast bit makes improving your TV a federal offense.
  • The Regulatorium is complex and self reinforcing like a ball of wax. It will bounce but it won’t stick to any real surface.
  • To win at Roulette you spin the wheel and then find value in whatever number you get. Only a fool will put himself into a position where there is only one way to win rather than finding value in whatever you get.
  • The goal must be to assure that we can create our own solutions. It’s not about the carriers mistreating us equally while assuring their profitability.
  • Neutral is not enough – it is about our ability to use our networks rather than being tenants communicating at the sufferance of the carriers.
  • Rather than seek neutrality as a concession we must address the structural problems inherent in the concept of “telecommunications”.
  • We’ve come a long way since 1980 when we didn’t even own the wires in our own homes. It’s 2006 why don’t we own the wires in our community?
  • We don’t know who will create the new services so we must make sure that everyone can so someone will.
  • If we can tolerate failure we can get the benefits success. That’s why the Internet has been so successful. It’s also an essential part of capitalism. Corporations are a unit of risk taking but we only get the benefits if corporations can die when they become dysfunctional.
  • 25 years ago we leased the wires in our homes. Today we own them. When will we own the wires in our communities and between our communities?
  • Today we buy services not transport – it’s like the days when you bought light rather than buying electricity and supplying your own bulbs.